The Flowers That Start With V: 12 Of The Most Fantastic

To Hermes

Hermes is the mythological emissary who would carry the messages of the Greek gods with speed and grace. One legend tells of Hermes accidentally, and fatally wounding his dear friend Crocus, whose spilled blood gave birth the Crocus flower. Although we may not be privy to the gods or have Hermes’ winged sandals, we too may send meaningful messages with grace with flowers. Take for example these flowers that start with V.

As you decide on a gift and a message for a dear loved one or a fellow flower enthusiast, consider the symbolism behind the bloom.

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​12 Fantastic Flowers

1. Viburnum

  • Botanical name: Viburnum
  • Plant Class: Deciduous shrub
  • Bloom time: Spring

There are approximately 150 species of Viburnums, most of which are native to the Northern Hemisphere. Their delicate bouquet-like flowers bloom in creamy white and pink clusters. But don’t let these tiny blooms fool you, the viburnum is a tough, sturdy plant that can endure the elements, drought and most climates once you establish it.

The viburnums durability aptly symbolizes strength, resilience, and a strong spirit.

2. Vervaine

  • Botanical name: Verbena
  • Plant Class: Perennials & annuals
  • Bloom time: Summer to early fall

Another seemingly unimportant flower with tiny blooms is the Vervaine. Its blossoms sprout from multipleflower spikes, similar to a candelabra. The spikes hold pale lilac or lavender blooms, emitting a distinct light aroma. The Vervaine’s botanical name originates from its description in Ancient Rome as an aromatic in religious services. In modern times, the Vervaine has applications in traditional and herbal medicine. So, despite its small flowers, the Vervaine plant holds a crucial place in healing.

The Vervaine represents sensibility and iron-hard will.

3. Venus-looking-glass

  • Botanical name: Triodanisperfoliata
  • Plant Class: Annual
  • Bloom time: Spring to summer

Hermes would have shown quite an interest in the Venus-looking-glass as the plant derives its name from the goddess of love and beauty, and once Hermes’ lover. It is an apt name for the eye-catching violet-purple blossoms of this spring annual, easily as seductive as the goddess.

Why “looking-glass”? You may ask. This name is due to the plant’s very shiny, almost mirror-like, oval seeds.

The Venus-looking-glass represents the danger of vanity in extreme beauty.

4. Violet

  • Botanical name: Viola odorata
  • Plant Class: Perennial
  • Bloom time: Spring to summer

In contrast to the familiar nursery rhyme, violets are not blue. Violets are, well, violet and extremely sweet-smelling. The viola odorata is so fragrant that history calls them Sweet violets as they emit their pleasant odor from impressive inflorescences. Many an artist, writer, and painter have soaked in the fragrance of violets during their many inspirations.

The sweet violet symbolizes affection, nobility, dignity and goodness.

5. Vetch

  • Botanical name: Vicia sativa
  • Plant Class: Annual
  • Bloom time: Summer to fall

Although common and tiny, the purples and pinks of the Vetch flower may entrance you still. You’re not alone though as bumblebees love visiting the bright flowers.

The vetch is a favorite among those who raise horses and cattle since they thrive (and even fatten) on these plants.

The blooms of the vetch represent the beauty and elegance in simplicity.

6. Vetchling

  • Botanical name: Lathyruspratensis
  • Plant Class: Perennial
  • Bloom time: Summer to fall

No, the vetchling is not an immature vetch, rather it comes from the pea family and is also known as the Meadow pea-vine. The vetchling’s blooms sprout from racemes with bright splashes of sun yellow. This deep color makes sure that despite its size the blossoms of the vetch will leave you saying, “fantastic.”

The Vetchling’s seemingly glowing flowers represent how the smallest of lights can enlighten the darkest of rooms.

​7. ​Valerian

Valeriana Officinalis Caprifoliaceae
  • Botanical name: ​Valeriana Officinalis, Caprifoliaceae
  • Plant Class: Perennial
  • Bloom time: ​June to July

​Valerian is an interesting perennial plant having unusual tiny florets arranged in bilateral or radial symmetry. It is native to Asia and Europe, and typically blooms in the summer between June and July. This is very common in Finland, including Lapland. It belongs to the honeysuckle family called Caprifoliaceae and formerly a member of Valerianaceae. Other names known for this are Garden Heliotrope and All-Heal.

​This flowering plant reaches up to 5 feet. When it blossoms, clusters of white or pale pink small flowers create a charm in the surroundings. These flowers are also fragrant causing easy attraction to pollinators.

The scientific name of this genus comes from the Latin word “valere”, which means to be strong and refers to having a reflection of the faith.

​8. ​Veronica Incana (Silver Speedwell)

Veronica Incana Silver Speedwell
  • Botanical name: ​​Veronica Incana
  • Plant Class: Perennial
  • Bloom time: ​​Late Spring or Early Summer

​Thriving best in rock gardens and alpines, Veronica Incana, or commonly known as Silver Speedwell, is a herbaceous perennial plant. It tolerates dry or well-drained soil conditions with partial to full sun exposure, but regular water is still needed.

​It grows in a bushy foliage up to 1.5 feet in height. Leaves are narrow, toothed and lance-shaped and in astonishing silver-gray color with long, white hairs. Starting late spring, this produces tiny purplish blue flowers from long terminal racemes. They tend to stay for a month long, especially when cut as it promotes better or more blooms.

​9. ​​Vinca Minor (Lesser Periwinkle/Dwarf Periwinkle/Myrtle)

Vinca Minor Lesser Periwinkle Dwarf Periwinkle Myrtle
  • Botanical name: ​​​Vinca Minor
  • Plant Class: Perennial
  • Bloom time: ​May, June

​Also known as Periwinkle (Lesser and Dwarf), Myrtle, Vinca Minor is a common flowering plant native to central and southern Europe, including Portugal, France,the Netherlands and the Baltic States, Caucasus, and southwestern Asia in Turkey but now thriving in many regions around the world. It belongs to the family Apocynaceae. This is popularly used as ornamental and medicinal plant.

​Considered as an evergreen, herbaceous subshrub, this plant grows as tall as 3 feet. In addition to its oval-oblong glossy and hairless leaves, it has five-petal flowers that bloom in purple, pink or white.

This symbolizes strength and purity and strength as well as achieving great things in life. Its flowers may be small in size and gentle and fragile looking but it is strong that lasts for some time.

​​10. ​​​Viola

Viola 2
  • Botanical name: ​​​​Viola
  • Plant Class: ​Perennial/Annual
  • Bloom time: ​​Early Spring

​Viola has botanical similarities with Violet as it is also a member of the Violaceae family. This genus of flowering plants is the largest in the family having about 600 species, and mostly situated in temperate Northern Hemisphere with naturalized cultivation in Australia, Asia, Hawaii, and the Andes. In addition, it can be either perennial or annual.

​Viola flowers are easy to identify with their heart or reniform (kidney) shape. They are zygomorphic with bilateral symmetry and solitary, and also formed as cymes. There are 5 petals, consisting 4 (2 each side) that are fan-shaped or unswept and 1 that is broad and lobed situated lower and pointed downward. Most petals are blue and violet but some are bi-colored or multi-colored.

a. Viola Wittrockiana (Pansy)

Viola Wittrockiana Pansy

Pansy, or Viola Wittrockiana, is a type of Viola and produces large flowers. What makes it different from other species is its overlapping double-layered upper petals with 2 side petals and 1 at the bottom.

The word pansy is French for “pensée”, which means thought. It symbolizes remembrance

​b. Viola Tri-Colour (Heartsease, Johnny Jump Up, Wild Pansy)

Viola Tri Colour Heartsease Johnny Jump Up Wild Pansy

​As its name suggests, Viola Tri-Colour is a species of Pansy that has three colors or tricolor shape. Its sepals are smaller than the corolla. The flowers are lateral and solitary, hoisted on long peduncles.

This is also known with other cute names, such as  Johnny Jump Up, Heart's Ease or Heartsease, Tickle-My-Fancy, Heart's Delight, Come-and-Cuddle-Me, and Jack-Jump-Up-and-Kiss-Me. The name "heart's-ease" is derived from St. Euphrasia, whereas its Greek translation refers to cheerfulness of mind.

​​1​1. ​Virgin's Bower

Virgin Bower Clematis Virginiana
  • Botanical name: ​Clematis Virginiana
  • Plant Class: ​Perennial​
  • Bloom time: ​July to September

​Virgin's Bower is a flowering vine that is perfect to cover arches, porch borders or edges and walls. That is because it can grow and climb up to 20 feet high by its twisting leafstalks.

​This plant has many names, which include Love Vine, Devil's Hair, Devil’s Darning Needles, Wild Hops, Traveller’s Joy, and Woodbine. It is a member of the Ranunculaceae family and native to North America.

Leaves of this plant are pinnately compound, opposite and trifoliate  or having 3 leaflets, with coarse, unequal teeth on the edges. In summer, it produces tiny but sweet-smelling white flowers.

​​1​​2. ​​Virginia Spiderwort

Virginia Spiderwort Tradescantia Virginiana
  • Botanical name: ​​Tradescantia Virginiana
  • Plant Class: ​Perennial​
  • Bloom time: ​​Early Spring

​Native to eastern part of the US, Virginia Spiderwort is a herbaceous flowering plant that blooms during the early weeks of spring. It easily grows in all types of gardens but also thrives in roadsides, even along the railways. This is adaptable in many types of soil, but most likely best in moist.

​This perennial plant can grow up to 3 feet. It has tubular, slender and branched stems with alternate, angular long and narrow leaves, and purple or blue colored flowers. In some species, white flowers are produced. Each flower head has 3 petals.

​Spider Lily is another common English name of this flowering plant. Its scientific name was given after John Tradescant, a gardener to former King Charles 1 of Great Britain.

How amazing and unique do these flowers that start with V? Many of these are easy to cultivate, grow and care. Which among them would you add to your garden?

Hoang Quang

Hello! I’m Quang Hoang and Grow Gardener is my little nook for all the adventures, and occasional misadventures, on my journey in gardening! As I continue to awaken life in little seeds and struggle to keep flora alive, I’ll be here sharing with all of you what I’ve learned! Join me in my little garden, and let’s grow together.

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